discussion

Wtf is audiate?

I read a post by Never Not Reading called I didn’t know I was reading wrong, awhile ago. I had never heard of the term audiate. According to Wikipedia, Audiation is a term Gordon coined in 1975 to refer to comprehension and internal realization of music, or the sensation of an individual hearing or feeling sound when it is not physically present. So to apply this theory to reading, audiate is when you ‘hear’ yourself speaking, in your mind, when you read to yourself. Wait, people don’t do this? Never Not Reading said that speed-readers don’t audiate, that’s how they read so fast. How is that possible? I can always hear myself when I read. I’m doing it right now as I type this. Even if someone is texting me, I will read their message and automatically ‘hear’ it in their voice and accent, in my head. Or if I’m reading fiction, I will give each character an accent or voice, in my mind. For example I read Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman (I reviewed it here) in January. I had originally started this story by listening to it on an audio book. It was an audio book read by Neil Gaiman himself, who would give each character their own accent as he read their dialogue. So when I continued to read this story as an ebook, I would read it and ‘hear’ Neil Gaiman’s voice and accents in my mind.

Do you audiate when you read? If so, do you feel it’s slowing down your reading? Do you only read and ‘hear’ in your ‘voice’ or do you have a plethora of accents and voices?

Well that’s all from me today. Don’t forget to, Read You Fools 😉
Charlie

gift guide

Bookish Mother’s Day Gift Guide

Bookish Mother’s Day Gift Guide

This post contains affiliate links. If you click on my link and then make a purchase, I will earn a small commission at no extra charge to you. Please read my disclosure page for more information.

This Sunday, March 14th is Mother’s Day in the UK and Ireland. So I have put together a list of thing’s I think would be great for any book loving Mummy’s out there (and this totally isn’t a personal wishlist of thing’s I want…wink wink!)

The Bibliophile Ceramic Vase: Collected Curiosities illustrated by Jane Mount and the Bibliophile Vase: The Writer’s Companion are so pretty! Can you imagine puting those beautiful bunch of Mother’s Day flowers (or a tiny hand picked bunch of daisies) into these pretty vases? What lovely pieces of decor to add to your bookshelves. You could have even put fake flowers in them and swap them out whenever you want something new. Or if your green fingered (which I definitely am not) maybe you could actually plant some small succulents in them.

How cool is this Led book lamp?! A literal ‘book’ lamp? And it has different coloured lights, a remote control and USB charging? So cool!

I couldn’t stop laughing at this metal sign That’S What I Do I Read Books I Drink Coffee And I Know Things Cat Vintage Look Metal Wall Decor

And to go with that sign, how about a cup of coffee (or tea) in this mug Book Lover Mug Gift, Bookish Gifts, Librarian Mug, Bookworm Mug, Yes I Really Do Need All These Books

What about a diy kit to make a magical book nook? Another piece of decor for your bookshelves Wizard Alley Themed Book Nook Shelf Insert – DIY Alley Book Nook Kit – Book Shelf Decor – Home Decor – Diorama. This would look so cool in amongst your favourite magical books.

I hope you liked my picks for bookish Mother’s Day gifts.

Well that’s all from me today. Don’t forget to, Read You Fools 😉

Charlie

Book review

The Watchmaker’s Daughter (Glass and Steele Book 1) by C.J. Archer – book review

This post contains affiliate links. Please read my disclosure page for more information.

I found this book for free on Google books but you can get it here
(for free at time of writing this) on Kindle from Amazon.

The Watchmaker’s Daughter by C.J. Archer, book review by Read You Fools

After the death of her father, India Steele finds herself without a fiance, a job and a home. As she looks for employment as a shop assistant in the other watch shops in the town, she finds Mr. Glass who is searching for a very specific person to fix his watch for him. So India finds herself a job as being his assistant in his search, but she knows something is not quite right about Mr. Glass and his special watch.

She then starts to think that Mr. Glass is the american outlaw that the newspapers have been talking about. All the evidence is pointing directly at him. Is she after putting herself in danger?

She then meets other employees (or are they friends?) of Mr. Glass, that live with him. They are also American and India thinks that they act quite weird. I quite liked the character Willie. A brash female with a male dress sense and a gun at her waist.

But then there’s his watch. Did you see the purple light? Or was she imagining things?

There are inconsistencies through out the story. For example India is first described as a plain looking girl who wouldn’t catch a fella to marry her for her looks. Then near the end she its described as a beauty that is too pretty to get a governess job. Unless this was how she saw herself? That when she recieved some attention she liked, she started to see the beauty in herself, maybe? Also the way Mr. Glass was healed or rejuvenated by his watch seems to take different amounts of time.

I also didn’t like the way her corset was written about. As I was someone who used to waist train and wear corsets daily for a few years. And who also has a love for researching historical dress/fashion. It pained me to then read the very stereotypical view, that corsets are a work of the devil and no-one could breath in them, or run, or move and they would require someone else to get you in and out of them. If you can’t breath in your corset then your not wearing the right corset for you. I could really get stuck into debating about them but this is not that post. Instead, I will just say, that I skimmed over the few mentions of her corset in this book. They didn’t add anything to the story anyways except for an excuse for a brief romance building section.

Even with the odd inconsistencies though, this book caught me, hook, line and sinker. Victorian-esque london? Yes historical fiction. Watches, clocks, cogs and gears? Yes please. A steampunk sounding watch with a bit of purple magic? You got me. I will more than likely be purchasing the next book in this series to see what adventures do Glass and Steele get up to next. I wonder will it explain more of the magic systems? I hope so.

The Watchmaker’s Daughter (Glass and Steele Book 1)

Well that’s all from me today. Don’t forget to, Read You Fools 😉

Charlie

Round up

Charlie’s Round-up January 2021

Charlie’s Round-up January 2021 – Read You Fools

I’m a tiny bit late but here is my monthly round-up for January 2021. My first full month of being a book blogger is complete. I’m slowly getting the hang of this blogging thing. I still have lots to learn but I’m really enjoying the journey and everyone in this community are wonderful and so welcoming.

To be read 2021 – Read You Fools

My first post of the month of January was my tbr (to be read) list of 2021. You can read it here. So far I have read 1 of them and have started 2 more so I feel that I am making good headway with it.

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman – book review – Read You Fools

My next post was my first book review. Neverwhere is an urban fantasy by Neil Gaiman and it was 1 of the books from my tbr list. You can read what I thought of it here.

20 Questions Tag – Read You Fools

My last post of January was the 20 questions tag. This was a fun little tag I did as a sort of introduction to myself. I love reading tags and I really enjoyed answering the questions. You can check it out here.

So that was all my posts for January 2021. I hope you enjoyed reading them. I’m looking forward to reading more books and writing new posts for February.

Well that’s all from me today. Don’t forget to, Read You Fools 😉

Charlie