Book review

The Watchmaker’s Daughter (Glass and Steele Book 1) by C.J. Archer – book review

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I found this book for free on Google books but you can get it here
(for free at time of writing this) on Kindle from Amazon.

The Watchmaker’s Daughter by C.J. Archer, book review by Read You Fools

After the death of her father, India Steele finds herself without a fiance, a job and a home. As she looks for employment as a shop assistant in the other watch shops in the town, she finds Mr. Glass who is searching for a very specific person to fix his watch for him. So India finds herself a job as being his assistant in his search, but she knows something is not quite right about Mr. Glass and his special watch.

She then starts to think that Mr. Glass is the american outlaw that the newspapers have been talking about. All the evidence is pointing directly at him. Is she after putting herself in danger?

She then meets other employees (or are they friends?) of Mr. Glass, that live with him. They are also American and India thinks that they act quite weird. I quite liked the character Willie. A brash female with a male dress sense and a gun at her waist.

But then there’s his watch. Did you see the purple light? Or was she imagining things?

There are inconsistencies through out the story. For example India is first described as a plain looking girl who wouldn’t catch a fella to marry her for her looks. Then near the end she its described as a beauty that is too pretty to get a governess job. Unless this was how she saw herself? That when she recieved some attention she liked, she started to see the beauty in herself, maybe? Also the way Mr. Glass was healed or rejuvenated by his watch seems to take different amounts of time.

I also didn’t like the way her corset was written about. As I was someone who used to waist train and wear corsets daily for a few years. And who also has a love for researching historical dress/fashion. It pained me to then read the very stereotypical view, that corsets are a work of the devil and no-one could breath in them, or run, or move and they would require someone else to get you in and out of them. If you can’t breath in your corset then your not wearing the right corset for you. I could really get stuck into debating about them but this is not that post. Instead, I will just say, that I skimmed over the few mentions of her corset in this book. They didn’t add anything to the story anyways except for an excuse for a brief romance building section.

Even with the odd inconsistencies though, this book caught me, hook, line and sinker. Victorian-esque london? Yes historical fiction. Watches, clocks, cogs and gears? Yes please. A steampunk sounding watch with a bit of purple magic? You got me. I will more than likely be purchasing the next book in this series to see what adventures do Glass and Steele get up to next. I wonder will it explain more of the magic systems? I hope so.

The Watchmaker’s Daughter (Glass and Steele Book 1)

Well that’s all from me today. Don’t forget to, Read You Fools 😉

Charlie